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Anesthesia/Surgery Consent Form
Contact Information
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First Name
Last Name
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Due to our new protocols aimed at reducing the possible spread of disease, we require that all clients provide a valid email address. This is where all documents and records will be sent, such as receipts, release forms, after surgery care instructions, and other important documents. If you do not have an email address, please create one before filling out this form.
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IMPORTANT NOTE: Each pet must have a separate Anesthesia/Surgery Consent Form filled out.
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Your pet's appointment date will have been provided to you by the St. Augustine Humane Society staff. If you do not have an appointment date, please call us at 904-829-2737 or email info@staughumane.org to schedule an appointment.
Anesthesia/Surgery Consent

The St. Augustine Humane Society (SAHS) uses qualified staffing and approved materials for all procedures performed. It is important for you to understand that the risk of injury or death, although extremely low, is always present, just as it is for humans who undergo surgery. Carefully read and understand the following before signing your name:

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Initials
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Initials, or "N/A" if not applicable
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Initials
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Initials
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Prefix
First Name
Last Name
Suffix
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(mm/dd/yyyy)

HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR PET AFTER SURGERY

After Hours Emergency Vet Phone Number (until 9:00pm): 904-770-9821

Thank you for bringing in your pet for sterilization. You are helping end the pet overpopulation problem. Since our clinic is not staffed 24 hours a day we ask that you, the owner and caretaker, monitor your pet to provide the best possible care. Please carefully read the post-op instructions. We cannot be held responsible for circumstances resulting from failure to follow these instructions.

  1. No running, jumping, playing, swimming, or other strenuous activity for 10 to 14 days. Keep your pet quiet. Pets must be kept indoors where they can stay clean, dry, and warm. No baths during the recovery period. Dogs must be walked on a leash and cats must be kept indoors. No Baths.
  2. Check the incision site twice daily. There should be no drainage. Redness and swelling should be minimal. Do not allow your pet to lick or chew at the incision. If this occurs, an E-collar MUST be used to prevent additional licking and chewing that could cause infection. There will be a FIRM LUMP under the incisions as the absorbable sutures are breaking down for 1 – 2 weeks. This is normal. THERE ARE NO EXTERNAL SUTURES, unless otherwise noted.
  3. Pain Medication. If you chose to purchase post-operative pain medication, you may start the first dose the next day after surgery.
  4. Appetite should return gradually within 24 hours of surgery. Do not change your pet’s diet at this time, and do not give them junk food, table scraps, milk, or any other people food during the recovery period. This could mask post-surgical complications.
  5. We recommend that your pet receive an exam with your regular veterinarian 7 to 10 days after surgery, to have the incision checked for complete healing, to remove any skin sutures, and to discuss additional needs, follow-up care, and vaccine boosters. Dogs may have a slight cough for a few days after surgery.

    **After 9:00 pm the night of surgery, refer to the following:
  6. If there are any questions or concerns directly related to the surgery during the recovery period, please call this office at 904.829.2737. If there is an emergency, contact your regular veterinarian or REACH a local Emergency Hospital. SARVAC at 904-797-5770 or Animal Emergency Hospital of St. Johns at 904.794.5071. Fees incurred at a location other than our clinic are your responsibility. Your regular veterinarian must address illness or injuries that are not a direct result of surgery.

Our Wellness Clinic is open every Wednesday and Thursday. Please don’t hesitate to call or bring your pet to the clinic if you have concerns. 904.829.2737

It is normal for your pet to be quiet and reserved for several hours after surgery. However, the following conditions require immediate attention:

  • Excessive Bleeding. Small droplets of blood can be normal. However, if it is a steady flow please call your vet or go directly to the emergency vet.
  • Breathing Difficulty. If your pet seems to have trouble breathing or if breathing is especially shallow, this could be an emergency situation. Please call your vet or go directly to the emergency vet.
  • Lethargy lasting for more than 24 hours post-op, diarrhea, or vomiting are not normal and your pet should be taken to your regular vet.

Your pet received a GREEN TATTOO next to his/her incision. This tattoo is a scoring process in the skin; IT IS NOT AN EXTRA INCISION.

FERAL CAT DISCHARGE AND RECOVERY INSTRUCTIONS

After Hours Emergency Vet Phone Number (until 9:00pm): 904-770-9821

ALLOW THE CAT TO RECOVER OVERNIGHT IN THE SAME TRAP

  • While the cats are recovering from anesthesia they are unable to regulate their body temperature. It’s important that the recovery location is temperature-controlled to keep the cats from getting too hot or too cold. A basement or bathroom will usually do the trick. The cat will display wobbly movements and shivering while waking from the anesthesia.
  • Let the cat recover overnight in the same trap. Keep the traps covered to reduce the cat’s stress. Place newspapers or towel under the trap to absorb urine and feces.
  • Keep the cat indoors in his covered trap and make sure he is dry and away from loud noises or dangers such as toxic fumes, other animals, or people.
  • Never open the trap doors or allow the cat out of the trap. Do not stick your fingers through the bars or attempt to handle the cat.

MONITOR THE CAT

  • Monitor well to ensure that cat is breathing normally and is not bleeding from the surgical site or ear tip site. It is normal to have a small amount of bleeding from the ear tip. It should stop by the next morning.
  • DO NOT try to handle the cat (this includes putting pain meds in the mouth)
  • All skin sutures are absorbable and do not need to be removed.
  • Check the cat often for progress; If a cat is vomiting, bleeding, having difficulty breathing, or not waking up, get veterinary assistance immediately.
  • If a cat is vomiting while still unconscious, his head should be turned to avoid choking. Sometimes this can be achieved by gently tipping the trap to no more than a 30 degree angle to change the cat’s position. Be careful when tipping the trap so that you don’t harm the cat by jostling him too much.

FEED AND PROVIDE CATS WITH WATER AFTER THEY REGAIN CONSCIOUSNESS

  • Cats can be fed shortly after waking from anesthesia and settled in. When the cat is awake, mix canned food with water, roll into ball, and drop into trap.

HOLD CATS UNTIL THEY RECOVER

  • Cats usually need to be held for 24 hours after surgery, depending on recovery speed. Cats can be returned to the trapping site 12-24 hours following surgery as long as they are fully awake and do not require further medical attention. Females may need 48 hours of recovery, depending on their specific circumstances.
  • Make sure all cats are fully conscious, clear-eyed, and alert before release.
  • If the cat is not recovering well from surgery for any reason (longer than 48 hours) and needs further care please seek medical care.

RETURN THE CAT

  • Cat needs to be fully awake and alert before it is released. Be sure it does not require any further medical care before releasing from trap.
  • Only release cat from trap at dawn or dusk. Release the cat in the same place you trapped him or her.
  • It is not uncommon for a cat to “disappear” for a few days after she is returned. She will appear eventually. Continue to provide food and water—she may eat when you are not around.
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